The Foreigner

Based on what the NY Post describes as a "devilishly clever idea", the play demonstrates what can happen when a group of devious characters must deal with a stranger who (they think) doesn't understand English

SPECIAL THURSDAY PRICING

Egyptian Theatre
328 Main Street
PO Box 3119
Park City UT 84060
435-649-9371

June 11, 2015 8:00PM
Ages: All Ages

Event Showtimes:

Thu
June 11, 2015 / 8:00PMBuy Tickets
Fri
June 12, 2015 / 8:00PMBuy Tickets
Sat
June 13, 2015 / 8:00PMBuy Tickets
Sun
June 14, 2015 / 6:00PMBuy Tickets

Online Tickets:

Cabaret: $29.00
House: $19.00
Preferred Front of House: $23.00

Tickets are available for purchase at the door for an additional $5 per ticket.


TICKETS:

THURSDAY:                         FRIDAY-SUNDAY:
HOUSE:                $19           
HOUSE:                $23
FRONT-OF-HOUSE: $23           FRONT-OF-HOUSE: $29
CABARET:             $29           CABARET:              $35

TICKETS SOLD AT THE DOOR 30 MINUTES PRIOR TO THE SHOW ARE $5 MORE
TICKET SALES ARE NON-REFUNDABLE. SEE BOX OFFICE POLICIES

The Foreigner is a two-act comedy by American playwright Larry Shue, which earned two Obie Awards and two Outer Critics Circle Awards as Best New American Play and Best Off-Broadway Production.  An inspired comic romp, equal in inventive hilarity to the author's classic comedy The Nerd.

"I laughed start to finish at one comic surprise after another." —The New Yorker
"…a constant invitation to relax and laugh at the foolishness of life…" —Village Voice
"Shue's comedy is positively antic, yet pleasantly seasoned with a few dashes of sentimentality…He has raided comedy's storehouse…" —Bergen Record

 

THE STORY: The scene is a fishing lodge in rural Georgia often visited by "Froggy" LeSeuer, a British demolition expert who occasionally runs training sessions at a nearby army base. This time "Froggy" has brought along a friend, a pathologically shy young man named Charlie who is overcome with fear at the thought of making conversation with strangers. So "Froggy," before departing, tells all assembled that Charlie is from an exotic foreign country and speaks no English. Once alone the fun really begins, as Charlie overhears more than he should—the evil plans of a sinister, two-faced minister and his redneck associate; the fact that the minister's pretty fiancée is pregnant; and many other damaging revelations made with the thought that Charlie doesn't understand a word being said. That he does fuels the nonstop hilarity of the play and sets up the wildly funny climax in which things go uproariously awry for the "bad guys," and the "good guys" emerge triumphant.    

Presented by The Neil Simon Festival