An Evening with JJ Grey

JJ Grey embarks on a solo tour and remains an unfettered, blissful performer, singing with a blue-collared spirit over the bone-deep grooves of his compositions. Don't miss him in this rare and intimate setting!

Reduced priced tickets Thursday & Friday. 8pm shows nightly. NO OPENER!

Event Showtimes:

Thu
May 14, 2020 / 8:00PMBuy Tickets
Fri
May 15, 2020 / 8:00PMBuy Tickets
Sat
May 16, 2020 / 8:00PMBuy Tickets
Ages: All Ages


Thursday pricing: $35/House & Balcony, $43/Front of House, $53/Cabaret

Friday pricing: $39/House & Balcony, $49/Front of House, $59/Cabaret

Saturday pricing: $45/House & Balcony, $55/Front of House, $65/Cabaret

Tickets increase by $5 half hour before show time.

All sales final, no refunds!  Exchanges may be made for the same show, different date only.  Based on availability and 24 hours notice must be given to the box office prior to original ticket date.  $5 per ticket exchange fee and any price difference applies.

Artist page: http://www.jjgrey.com/

Wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JJ_Grey_%26_Mofro

Onstage, Grey delivers his songs with compassion and a relentless honesty, but perhaps not until Ol’ Glory has a studio record captured the fierceness and intimacy that defines a Grey live performance. “I wanted that crucial lived-in feel,” Grey says of Ol’ Glory, and here he hits his mark. On the new album, Grey offers grace and groove in equal measure, with an easygoing quality to the production that makes those beautiful muscular drum-breaks sound as though the band has set up in your living room.

Despite a redoubtable stage presence, Grey does get performance anxiety—specifically, when he's suspended 50 feet above the soil of his pecan grove, clearing moss from the upper trees.

“The tops of the trees are even worse,” he laughs, “say closer to 70, maybe even 80 feet. I'm not phobic about heights, but I don't think anyone's crazy about getting up in a bucket and swinging all around. I wanted to fertilize this year but didn't get a chance. This February I will, about two tons—to feed the trees.”

When he isn't touring, Grey exerts his prodigious energies on the family land, a former chicken-farm that was run by his maternal grandmother and grandfather. The farm boasts a recording studio, a warehouse that doubles as Grey's gym, an open-air barn, and of course those 50-odd pecan trees that occasionally require Grey to go airborne with his sprayer.

For devoted listeners, there is something fitting, even affirmative in Grey's commitment to the land of his north Florida home. The farms and eddying swamps of his youth are as much a part of Grey's music as the Louisiana swamp-blues tradition, or the singer's collection of old Stax records.